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Year : 2021  |  Volume : 69  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 1127--1128

“Acute Onset Paraplegia—Look at the Aorta, if Spinal Cord Imaging is Normal”

Thomas Mathew, Saji K John, GG Sharath Kumar 
 Department of Neurology, St. John's Medical College Hospital, Sarjapura Road, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Thomas Mathew
Department of Neurology, St. John's Medical College Hospital, Sarjapura Road, Bengaluru 560 034, Karnataka
India




How to cite this article:
Mathew T, John SK, Sharath Kumar G G. “Acute Onset Paraplegia—Look at the Aorta, if Spinal Cord Imaging is Normal”.Neurol India 2021;69:1127-1128


How to cite this URL:
Mathew T, John SK, Sharath Kumar G G. “Acute Onset Paraplegia—Look at the Aorta, if Spinal Cord Imaging is Normal”. Neurol India [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Oct 24 ];69:1127-1128
Available from: https://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2021/69/4/1127/325372


Full Text



A 64 years old male, a security guard by occupation, a chronic smoker, presented with sudden onset severe back pain followed by acute onset bilateral lower limb weakness and numbness. On examination, the patient had accelerated hypertension with well felt peripheral pulses. Blood pressure in the right upper limb was 190/110 mmHg and in left upper limb was 104/100 mmHg. Neurological examination revealed flaccid paraplegia with absent touch, pain, and temperature with a sensory level of T10 but preserved proprioception. Clinically, a provisional diagnosis of the anterior spinal artery occlusion was made. MRI of the spine showed normal cord parenchyma. However, on careful evaluation of MRI, a double-barrel aorta was observed with intramural thrombus in the false lumen, from the arch of aorta up to bilateral common iliac artery [Figure 1] and [Figure 2] which confirmed the diagnosis of anterior spinal artery occlusion secondary to aortic dissection.{Figure 1}{Figure 2}

Acute onset paraplegia can be a presenting manifestation of aortic dissection in 3–5% of the patients.[1] These aortic dissections can be painful or painless, and in many case reports, classical back or chest pain was conspicuously absent.[2],[3],[4],[5] As MRI signal changes in anterior spinal artery occlusion may be delayed for a few days,[6] it is prudent to look at aortic lumen for any dissection or thrombosis. Aortic dissection being one of the known causes of the anterior cord syndrome, aorta should always be examined while evaluating the imaging in suspected cases of anterior spinal artery occlusion.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

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