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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 68  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1139--1143

Differential Distribution of Cerebral Microbleeds in Subtypes of Acute Ischemic Minor Stroke and TIA as well as its Association with Vascular Risk Factors

Praveen Kesav1, Deepak Menon1, KV Vysakha1, Chandrasekaran Kesavadas2, Sapna E Sreedharan1, Sankara Sarma3, PN Sylaja1 
1 Comprehensive Stroke Care Program, Department of Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, India
2 Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, India
3 Department of Biostatistics (Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies), Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. P N Sylaja
Comprehensive Stroke Care Program, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum - 695 011, Kerala
India

Background: Cerebral microbleed (CMB) is a novel neuroimaging marker of cerebral small vessel disease. Objective: To determine the prevalence of CMB in the subtypes of acute ischemic minor stroke (AIS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) and to identify the risk factors associated with location and number of CMB. Materials and Methods: Patients with AIS (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale of 5 or less) or TIA were included. CMB was characterized using the Microbleed Anatomical Rating Scale (MARS). Results: Of the 488 subjects [mean age (standard deviation): 57.5 years (14.4 years), males (77.7%)] recruited, CMB was noted in 140 (28.7%). About 35% with CMB had a lacunar stroke etiology, whereas LAA and CE subtype constituted 33.6 and 10.7%, respectively (P = 0.000). Lacunar subtype was more likely to harbor multiple CMB (four or more) and CMB in all locations (lobar, deep or infratentorial). On multivariate analysis, systemic hypertension [P = 0.025; odds ratio (OR) 0.33 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.129–0.874)], serum triglyceride (TG) levels below 150 mg/dL [P = 0.001; OR 3.70 (95% CI 1.698–8.072)], and presence of white matter hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging brain [P = 0.026; OR 2.18 (95% CI 1.096–4.337)] were associated with the presence of CMB. Those with serum TG levels of less than 150 mg/dL were more likely to harbor lobar (P = 0.002) or infratentorial CMB (P = 0.022), whereas those with serum creatinine levels of more than1.5 mg/dL have lobar CMB (P = 0.033). Conclusion: Our study showed a differential distribution of CMB in ischemic stroke subtypes and association of risk factors with the presence, number and location of CMB.


How to cite this article:
Kesav P, Menon D, Vysakha K V, Kesavadas C, Sreedharan SE, Sarma S, Sylaja P N. Differential Distribution of Cerebral Microbleeds in Subtypes of Acute Ischemic Minor Stroke and TIA as well as its Association with Vascular Risk Factors.Neurol India 2020;68:1139-1143


How to cite this URL:
Kesav P, Menon D, Vysakha K V, Kesavadas C, Sreedharan SE, Sarma S, Sylaja P N. Differential Distribution of Cerebral Microbleeds in Subtypes of Acute Ischemic Minor Stroke and TIA as well as its Association with Vascular Risk Factors. Neurol India [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jan 22 ];68:1139-1143
Available from: https://www.neurologyindia.com/article.asp?issn=0028-3886;year=2020;volume=68;issue=5;spage=1139;epage=1143;aulast=Kesav;type=0