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NEUROIMAGE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 69  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1624

The midline cerebellar lesion in experimental Wernicke disease


1 Medstar Washington Hospital Center, Department of Neurology, 106 Irving St NW; Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Neurology, 3800 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC, USA
2 Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Neurology, 3800 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC, USA

Date of Web Publication23-Dec-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Guillaume Lamotte
Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Neurology, 3800 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.333505

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How to cite this article:
Laureno R, Lamotte G. The midline cerebellar lesion in experimental Wernicke disease. Neurol India 2021;69:1624

How to cite this URL:
Laureno R, Lamotte G. The midline cerebellar lesion in experimental Wernicke disease. Neurol India [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jan 18];69:1624. Available from: https://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2021/69/6/1624/333505




Pictured are slices of the brainstem (A) and cerebellum (B) from a dog with experimental Wernicke disease [Figure 1]. This image is notable because it demonstrates that a midline cerebellar (vermian) lesion can occur in Wernicke disease. There has been a debate on whether the midline cerebellar disease of malnourished alcoholics is nutritional or a toxic condition.[1],[2],[3],[4] This photo shows evidence for a nutritional cause of midline cerebellar disease.
Figure 1: Slices of the brainstem (a) and cerebellum (b) from a dog with experimental Wernicke disease

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The experimental Wernicke disease was produced by the well-established method of providing a thiamine free diet and subcutaneously injecting pyrithiamine, an inhibitor of thiamine metabolism.[3] The institutional review board approved the study and a detailed report will be forthcoming.

Financial support and sponsorship

This study was funded by the Medlantic Research Institute. The funding body has not been involved in the design of the study and collection, analysis, and interpretation of data.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Andersen BB. Reduction of Purkinje cell volume in cerebellum of alcoholics. Brain Res 2004;1007:10-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Luo J. Effects of ethanol on the cerebellum: Advances and prospects. Cerebellum 2015;14:383-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Victor M, A. R., Collins GH. The Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome and Related Neurologic Disorders due to Alcoholism and Malnutrition. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Davis; 1989.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Laureno R. Nutritional cerebellar degeneration, with comments on its relationship to Wernicke disease and alcoholism. Handb Clin Neurol 2012;103:175-87.  Back to cited text no. 4
    


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