Atormac
brintellex
Neurology India
menu-bar5 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus
  Users online: 4140  
 Home | Login 
About Editorial board Articlesmenu-bullet NSI Publicationsmenu-bullet Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe Videos Etcetera Contact
  Navigate Here 
 »   Next article
 »   Previous article
 »   Table of Contents

 Resource Links
 »   Similar in PUBMED
 »  Search Pubmed for
 »  Search in Google Scholar for
 »Related articles
 »   Citation Manager
 »   Access Statistics
 »   Reader Comments
 »   Email Alert *
 »   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed377    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded19    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 BRIEF REPORT
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 68  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1196--1200

A Rare Fatal Cause of Acute Areflexic Quadriparesis in the Tropics


1 Department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Nephrology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
3 Department of Internal Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
4 Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Samhita Panda
Department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.299153

Rights and Permissions

Background: Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever is a sporadic zoonotic viral illness recently becoming endemic in regions in the western parts of India. It usually presents as a viral hemorrhagic fever with severe liver and kidney failure. Case Report: An 18-year-old male from the western part of Rajasthan presented with rapidly progressing areflexic weakness of limbs a week after brief fever. He deteriorated rapidly with drowsiness, fulminant liver failure, and acute kidney injury with high creatine kinase. He also developed thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage from various sites. Workup for viral hemorrhagic fever revealed IgM positivity for Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever. The patient kept worsening and died of multiorgan failure and diffuse alveolar bleeding after 14 days. Conclusions: This report highlights the need to expand the differential diagnoses in the commonly encountered presentation of acute quadriparesis to include the possibility of tick-borne diseases like Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever in the setting of bleeding diathesis and acute hepatorenal syndrome.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow