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 INDIAN PERSPECTIVE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 68  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1008--1011

Adaptations in Radiosurgery Practice during COVID Crisis


1 Department of Neurosurgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Neurosurgery, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Manjul Tripathi
Associate Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, Neurosurgery Office, Nehru Hospital, 5th Floor, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.299161

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Background: The world is in the midst of the COVID crisis, which has forced the neurosurgical community to change its practices. Objective: To advocate the necessary adaptations in radio surgical practices to effectively manage the radio surgical patients, resource utilization, and protecting the healthcare provider during the COVID pandemic. Material and Methods: In addition to the literature review, pertinent recommendations are made in respect to the gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Results: Every patient presenting to GKRS treatment should be considered as a potential asymptomatic COVID carrier. Patients should be categorized based on the priority (urgent, semi-urgent, or elective) on the basis of pathological and clinical status. The only urgent indication is a non-responding or enlarging cerebral metastasis. There is a high risk of aerosol dispersion during gamma radiation delivery in the gamma gantry. Conclusion: These recommendations should be used to minimize the chances of pathogenic exposure to the patient and caregivers both.






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