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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 27--30

Practice patterns of neurology in India: Fewer hands, more work


Department of Neurology, Grant Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, India

Correspondence Address:
S V Khadilkar
110, 1st Floor, New Wing, Bombay Hospital, 12 New Marine Lines, Mumbai - 400 020
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.30423

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Background: India is a populous country housing over a billion people. Neurology as a specialty is being practiced in India for over 50 years but the number of physicians devoted to fulltime neurology is limited. This fact coupled with the privatized healthcare system and limited infrastructure has led to situations different from the more developed healthcare systems. Aim: To study the practice patterns of neurology in India. Setting and Design: Questionnaire-based study. Materials and Methods: Questionnaire was sent to 250 members of the Indian Academy of Neurology [sample size approximately 25%] using random number table. The responses were tabulated and analyzed. Results and Conclusions: The neurology group is small and hence is exposed to a large workload. The average number of patients seen daily by Indian neurologists is three to four times those seen by the United States and United Kingdom neurologists. Neurologists based at district places are more likely to see direct patients; whereas metropolitan neurologists see more referrals. Investigative facilities are available to neurologists but affordability is a concern. Clinical work leaves less time for academic and research activities, which the consultants are keen to participate in. In the privatized health system of India, emergency work constitutes a difficult area to cope with. The concept of single specialty group practice is welcomed by the majority with the idea of streamlining their work and life. These factors highlight an urgent need for increasing the neurology work force and argue for further involvement of primary physicians and internists in neurological care in India.






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