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Year : 2002  |  Volume : 50  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 337--9

Atypical benign partial epilepsy of childhood (pseudo-Lennox syndrome) : report of two brothers.


Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Ankara University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey., Turkey

Correspondence Address:
G Deda
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Ankara University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 12391466

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Two brothers (3 and 2 year old) with characteristic findings of atypical benign partial epilepsy of childhood (pseudo-Lennox syndrome) are reported, to emphasize the presence of a possibility of a genetic basis of this disorder and the importance of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), vigabatrin (VGB) and lamotrigine (LTG) therapy. Sleep EEGs of both the patients showed typical features of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. On follow-up, the convulsions were found to be resistant to numerous antiepileptic agents in one patient while they were easily controlled with LTG monotherapy in the other patient. In the elder brother, who was diagnosed as intractable epilepsy, the convulsions disappeared with IVIG and VGB. During the long term follow-up, they were seizure free for five and two years respectively, and their mental motor development was excellent.






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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow